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Griffin > Personal experiences of Internet crime > Cyber crime is not in isolation
by: Kerry O'Donoghue

You may find that in many cases the Hacker, Cyber Criminal or whatever you want to call them is not just acting via the web they are very often involved in 'real world' crimes too without sometimes realising it, or the information they gained is involved in other crimes i.e. ID fraud will be carried out over the web sometimes but the same ID will be sold to another and that person may well use it for buying physical items on the web which then are sold in Bars etc. Card cloning is another problem and then the information is transferred from one magnetic strip to another. I have seen staff in organisations transfer money electronically to fund terrorism, to facilitate the purchase of properties to house people who were trafficked illegally. Cyber crime is popular with organised crime as those who carry out the crimes do it and view it as a victimless crime so it is easy to recruit people to do it or blackmail normally honest people into comitting the cyber crime, which I have seen. A cyber criminal most of the time would not break into a house to steal anything or mug an old lady because they would have to encounter the victim, but via computer they will empty that same old ladies bank account without a second thought or facilitate the illegal purchase of a house to be used as a brothel for trafficked women. The only difference is the cyber criminal does not have to face the victim so their conscience is clear, all they did was sit behind a computer and tap a few keys.
1581 days ago | 2 Thumb-ups 
Just thinking about the chain idea... that might actually be a pretty good narrative structure for the series. Perhaps the thread that runs through the episodes could be following a chain?
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Griffin > Personal experiences of Internet crime > Cyber crime is not in isolation
by: Kerry O'Donoghue

You may find that in many cases the Hacker, Cyber Criminal or whatever you want to call them is not just acting via the web they are very often involved in 'real world' crimes too without sometimes realising it, or the information they gained is involved in other crimes i.e. ID fraud will be carried out over the web sometimes but the same ID will be sold to another and that person may well use it for buying physical items on the web which then are sold in Bars etc. Card cloning is another problem and then the information is transferred from one magnetic strip to another. I have seen staff in organisations transfer money electronically to fund terrorism, to facilitate the purchase of properties to house people who were trafficked illegally. Cyber crime is popular with organised crime as those who carry out the crimes do it and view it as a victimless crime so it is easy to recruit people to do it or blackmail normally honest people into comitting the cyber crime, which I have seen. A cyber criminal most of the time would not break into a house to steal anything or mug an old lady because they would have to encounter the victim, but via computer they will empty that same old ladies bank account without a second thought or facilitate the illegal purchase of a house to be used as a brothel for trafficked women. The only difference is the cyber criminal does not have to face the victim so their conscience is clear, all they did was sit behind a computer and tap a few keys.
1581 days ago | 1 Thumb-up 
Anyone who's ever played Shadowrun (no, not the xbox game) knows how useful a hacker can be.
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Griffin > Personal experiences of Internet crime > Cyber crime is not in isolation
by: Kerry O'Donoghue

You may find that in many cases the Hacker, Cyber Criminal or whatever you want to call them is not just acting via the web they are very often involved in 'real world' crimes too without sometimes realising it, or the information they gained is involved in other crimes i.e. ID fraud will be carried out over the web sometimes but the same ID will be sold to another and that person may well use it for buying physical items on the web which then are sold in Bars etc. Card cloning is another problem and then the information is transferred from one magnetic strip to another. I have seen staff in organisations transfer money electronically to fund terrorism, to facilitate the purchase of properties to house people who were trafficked illegally. Cyber crime is popular with organised crime as those who carry out the crimes do it and view it as a victimless crime so it is easy to recruit people to do it or blackmail normally honest people into comitting the cyber crime, which I have seen. A cyber criminal most of the time would not break into a house to steal anything or mug an old lady because they would have to encounter the victim, but via computer they will empty that same old ladies bank account without a second thought or facilitate the illegal purchase of a house to be used as a brothel for trafficked women. The only difference is the cyber criminal does not have to face the victim so their conscience is clear, all they did was sit behind a computer and tap a few keys.
1581 days ago | 2 Thumb-ups 
...so what you're saying is, Griffin should show the whole chain of crime instead of just one link?
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Griffin > Personal experiences of Internet crime > Cyber crime is not in isolation
Tell us your personal experiences on Internet crime. Have you been a victim of a crime, or have you (god forbid!) committed one (Piracy not included :). Or maybe you know somebody who has done something.
1582 days ago | 6 Comments | 5 Thumb-ups 

You may find that in many cases the Hacker, Cyber Criminal or whatever you want to call them is not just acting via the web they are very often involved in 'real world' crimes too without sometimes realising it, or the information they gained is involved in other crimes i.e. ID fraud will be carried out over the web sometimes but the same ID will be sold to another and that person may well use it for buying physical items on the web which then are sold in Bars etc.

Card cloning is another problem and then the information is transferred from one magnetic strip to another. I have seen staff in organisations transfer money electronically to fund terrorism, to facilitate the purchase of properties to house people who were trafficked illegally.

Cyber crime is popular with organised crime as those who carry out the crimes do it and view it as a victimless crime so it is easy to recruit people to do it or blackmail normally honest people into comitting the cyber crime, which I have seen. A cyber criminal most of the time would not break into a house to steal anything or mug an old lady because they would have to encounter the victim, but via computer they will empty that same old ladies bank account without a second thought or facilitate the illegal purchase of a house to be used as a brothel for trafficked women. The only difference is the cyber criminal does not have to face the victim so their conscience is clear, all they did was sit behind a computer and tap a few keys.

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Griffin > Links, stories & articles > What happens when the net goes down?
Share us with links, stories and articles related to crimes committed over the Internet.
1616 days ago | 1 Comment | 1 Thumb-up 

Very interesting in the light of the global 404 scenario in the Griffin teaser:

http://fora.tv/2010/04/01/Six_Easy_Steps_to_Avert_the_Collapse_of_Civilization#David_Eagleman_What_Happens_When_the_Net_Goes_Down

We need to have a backup of everything...

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Griffin > Links, stories & articles > Sentinels, Censors, And Publishers
by: Jack Malinowski

controlling text used to be major business. it would sure be interesting to project a world where hacking was on the decline such that someone thought they had to 'free the world.' http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704094104575143391819054502.html maybe hackers which were once privately dealt with became public enemies for illegal publishing?
1632 days ago | 3 Thumb-ups 
Jack, do you mean that hacking would be the only way people could avoid censorship?
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Jack Malinowski gave a shot "China takes over 'Siberia'" for Griffin
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Griffin > Links, stories & articles > China takes over 'Siberia'
Share us with links, stories and articles related to crimes committed over the Internet.
1636 days ago | 0 Comments | 2 Thumb-ups 

perhaps in Griffin's near future, Chinese forces most represent the i.d. fraud police? with the mounting complications of indy publishing while most of the rest of the world continues to deal with hackers privately for the most part, Chinese bounty hunters might be granted dispensation to sequester problematic pamphleteers?

http://blogs.ajc.com/jay-bookman-blog/2010/03/24/godaddy-com-refuses-to-play-little-brother-to-chinas-big-brother/?cxntfid=blogs_jay_bookman_blog

Such that top secret hacker concentration camps became a Chinese monopoly?

where once rogue poets were sent to Siberia... now they must avoid capture for risk of chinese capture?

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Griffin > Links, stories & articles > Sentinels, Censors, And Publishers
Share us with links, stories and articles related to crimes committed over the Internet.
1636 days ago | 4 Comments | 3 Thumb-ups 

controlling text used to be major business.

it would sure be interesting to project a world where hacking
was on the decline such that someone thought they had to
'free the world.'

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704094104575143391819054502.html

maybe hackers which were once privately dealt with became public enemies for illegal publishing?

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Griffin > Links, stories & articles > Over 100,000 passwords stolen and made public in Finland
by: Tianyi Pan

What a damage control disaster. Apparently, a list containing over 100,000 cleartext usernames, passwords and email addresses, cracked from several Finnish sites, is circulating on the Internet. The list was made public late yesterday night. Among others, there are email addresses from the Finnish police (@poliisi.fi) and the parliament (@eduskunta.fi) on the list, so something potentially very harmful could be done. On a lighter note, through this massive statistical data, it is proven that the two of the most popular passwords are "salasana" (Finnish for "password") and "123456". Finnish equivalent of FCC warning here (in Finnish): http://www.cert.fi/varoitukset/2010/varoitus-2010-01.html (And translated by Google): http://translate.google.com/translate?js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout=1&eotf=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.cert.fi%2Fvaroitukset%2F2010%2Fvaroitus-2010-01.html&sl=auto&tl=en Edit - Another news source for English: http://www.arcticstartup.com/2010/03/23/over-120-000-sanoma-user-credentials-stolen/
1638 days ago | 2 Thumb-ups 
F-Secure's blog post: http://www.f-secure.com/weblog/archives/00001915.html
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Griffin > Links, stories & articles > Over 100,000 passwords stolen and made public in Finland
Share us with links, stories and articles related to crimes committed over the Internet.
1639 days ago | 1 Comment | 5 Thumb-ups 

What a damage control disaster.

Apparently, a list containing over 100,000 cleartext usernames, passwords and email addresses, cracked from several Finnish sites, is circulating on the Internet. The list was made public late yesterday night.

Among others, there are email addresses from the Finnish police (@poliisi.fi) and the parliament (@eduskunta.fi) on the list, so something potentially very harmful could be done.

On a lighter note, through this massive statistical data, it is proven that the two of the most popular passwords are "salasana" (Finnish for "password") and "123456".

Finnish equivalent of FCC warning here (in Finnish):
http://www.cert.fi/varoitukset/2010/varoitus-2010-01.html
(And translated by Google):
http://translate.google.com/translate?js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout=1&eotf=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.cert.fi%2Fvaroitukset%2F2010%2Fvaroitus-2010-01.html&sl=auto&tl=en

Edit - Another news source for English:
http://www.arcticstartup.com/2010/03/23/over-120-000-sanoma-user-credentials-stolen/